Supporting and Nurturing Young Readers and Writers during the Pandemic and Beyond: Kathy Collins, Matt Glover, Aeriale Johnson and Vicki Vinton

 

Matt Glover

Vicki Vinton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In 2013, a University of Cambridge research team published a study that followed the reading history of two groups of children. One group began formal instruction in reading at the age of five. The second group had a more play-based curriculum and began their formal reading study at the age of seven. The results of the study were quite interesting. They concluded that by the age of 11 there was no difference in reading ability level between the two groups, but the children who started at 5 tended to develop less positive attitudes to reading, and showed poorer text comprehension than those children who had started later.The report  advised that “formal schooling” should be delayed until children are at least seven and that pushing it earlier is damaging children’s “academic achievement, especially when it comes to reading.” 

This report is particularly interesting to consider during this pandemic when children’s schooling has been so suddenly disrupted. No Child Left Behind, Race to The Top, Common Core Learning Standards, High Stakes Standardized Testing….all of these have traumatized educators, parents, and children, turning what should be the joy of learning into a competitive race. Now we add  to this pressurized school environment the terror of a destructive pandemic.

 There have been many magazine and newspaper articles where parents of young children expressed the fear that their children were falling behind. Parents and teachers worried that children would have difficulty when they were able to return to regular school. In a New York Times article, a mother of a kindergarten child voiced anxiety about her child and the other children in her child’s class. She worried about what would lie ahead for them when they entered first grade. ” If they are transitioning into first grade, will there be time to catch up and get them up to par?”

On Tuesday, January 5, 2020, I met with four extraordinary educators, Kathy Collins, Aeriale Johnson, Vicki Vinton and Matt Glover, to discuss their thoughts on how we can best support young learners during this time. What does reading and writing mean for a 4, 5, 6 and 7 year old? Should we have particular expectations? Can a child of that age be falling behind? 

Their conversation will, I believe, provide much comfort and food for thought for parents, teachers and school administrators. 

 

 

 

Books by the participating educators

 

Learn more aboutAlready ReadyLearn more aboutCraft and Process Studies

 

Learn more aboutProjecting Possibilities for Writers

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “Supporting and Nurturing Young Readers and Writers during the Pandemic and Beyond: Kathy Collins, Matt Glover, Aeriale Johnson and Vicki Vinton

  1. claudia

    Always a pleasure to read your posts and now watch these conversations…sad that teachers still have to swim against the current in order to do what’s right by young learners. Surely was having this same conversation when I started teaching 30 years ago and the rigidity and expectations are far more stringent now (and misguided). Good to know there are educators still swimming!

    Reply
      1. Renee Post author

        Thank you Claudia. I did wonder if the reading of the last piece was appropriate so I;m so glad that you liked it!
        Isn’t it truly a shame that we do have to keep having this same discussion. My fear is that new teachers are not going to have the wonderful opportunity to observe children and figure out what they know and what they should be doing next. These packaged programs seem to take away the important part of teaching.

        Reply
  2. Claudia

    “ new teachers are not going to have the wonderful opportunity to observe children and figure out what they know and what they should be doing next”…so true. Observing, listening and “assessing” what children do and say should lead the way, but if assessment is narrowly defined by packaged products you miss so much.

    Reply

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